donthatemecusimbeautiful:

The Original Twelve

sodomymcscurvylegs:

[AGGRESSIVELY AVOIDS USING HEALING ITEMS TO SAVE THEM FOR BOSS BATTLES.]

[AGGRESSIVELY FORGETS TO USE HEALING ITEMS DURING BOSS BATTLES.]

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier
There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 
A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.
The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.
Anatomy of the Blade
The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.
Tang
At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.
Ricasso
The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.
Blade
The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.
Edge
The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).
Point
The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.
Strong
The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.
Weak
The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.
Anatomy of the Guard
The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.
Pommel
A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.
Turk’s Head
A spacer between the counter weight and handle.
Handle
The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.
Crossbar Block
The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.
Crossbar
The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.
Sweepings
The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.
Knuckle Guard
Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.
Cup
The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier

There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 

A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.

The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.

  • Anatomy of the Blade

The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.

  • Tang

At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.

  • Ricasso

The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.

  • Blade

The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.

  • Edge

The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).

  • Point

The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.

  • Strong

The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.

  • Weak

The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.

  • Anatomy of the Guard

The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.

  • Pommel

A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.

  • Turk’s Head

A spacer between the counter weight and handle.

  • Handle

The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.

  • Crossbar Block

The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.

  • Crossbar

The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.

  • Sweepings

The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.

  • Knuckle Guard

Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.

  • Cup

The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

mma-gifs:

Finger Taekwondo Performance in Korea

grubsnuggle:

thebrickcave:

sixpenceee:

space-transgressor:

mopedsandbullshit:

blacksupervillain:

piccolowasablackman:

sixpenceee:

A reservoir of water three times the volume of all the oceans has been discovered deep beneath the Earth’s surface. The finding could help explain where Earth’s seas came from.

The water is hidden inside a blue rock that lies 700 kilometres underground in the mantle, the layer of hot rock between Earth’s surface and its core.

Some geologists think water arrived in comets as they struck planets, but the new discovery supports an alternative idea that the ocean oozed out of Earth’s interior layer.

SOURCE

OH MY GODDDDDDD -NERDS OUT-

That’s where the lizard people live

Watch

mind blown

WHAT THE FUCK

I just wanna point something out.

You know how you always see those pictures of the strange types of fish that live in the deep, deep sea?

like this one

or this one

and this one

If any and if possible imagine what the fish look like in the DEEP, DEEP sea. 

I’m smelling a million dollar creepy story. 

That smells awful… fishy

it begins 

jovi-angel-in-a-blue-box:

tastefullyoffensive:

[channelate] (bonus panel)

well.. that was a pleasant plot twist

jovi-angel-in-a-blue-box:

tastefullyoffensive:

[channelate] (bonus panel)

well.. that was a pleasant plot twist

agelfeygelach:

roachpatrol:

tastefullyoffensive:

Science Penguin [x]

i enjoy that every single human’s reaction to penguin is unrestrained delight

And penguins lack large terrestrial predators, so their reaction to humans tends to be, “HELLO STRANGE GIANT PENGUINS, WHAT ARE YOU DOING? DO YOU HAVE ANY FISH?”

feather-in-my-cap-and-cheese:

shsllittlebacon:

FUCK I DIDN’T GET THAT JOKE WHEN I WAS YOUNGER

THAT SHOW’S ONLY LIKE A YEAR OLD

(Source: completelybackasswards)

pizzaight:

shutsman:

WHAT SPORT IS THIS?

my sport

pizzaight:

shutsman:

WHAT SPORT IS THIS?

my sport